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Lisa Tantrum 

I stayed with my mum recently and my son basically blanked me for four days! I didn't mind that much as it was nice for those two to bond. But weirdly, I also noticed that when we bumped in his childminder out and about, he blanked her and basically didn't even acknowledge her. She said that's what all the kids do when they see her and her staff out and about. It made me wonder if kids have a sense of an 'alpha' caregiver they need to align themselves to in different situations (my guess is it's the one providing the food!). Has anyone else experienced this or does anyone have any insight into why it can happen?

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Anonymous 
We've definitely experienced something similar with our 21month old daughter. She tends to align herself to one particular adult and they are the focus of all care giving (whilst everyone else is blanked, including mum and dad). It seems to be whoever can provide the most entertainment/enthusiasm for her and she also has a bit of a thing for men with beards! But I agree, there is something about her finding the 'top dog' of the pack to align herself to. It's very interesting and I'm relieved to know we aren't alone!
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Anonymous 
We've definitely experienced something similar with our 21month old daughter. She tends to align herself to one particular adult and they are the focus of all care giving (whilst everyone else is blanked, including mum and dad). It seems to be whoever can provide the most entertainment/enthusiasm for her and she also has a bit of a thing for men with beards! But I agree, there is something about her finding the 'top dog' of the pack to align herself to. It's very interesting and I'm relieved to know we aren't alone!
Lisa Tantrum 
@anonymous - complicated creatures, these toddlers, aren't they? Yes, I think food and enthusiasm go a long way with kids - and I don't really blame them!
Celine Bell 
This is fascinating - not experienced it myself but will be on the look out!

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