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Anonymous 

I'm thinking of giving in and getting a dog. Am I mad?

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Anonymous 
Feedback from my sister: Lurchers are cross breeds, so potentially healthier than the pure breeds they come from (whippet and greyhound for example). They need lots of space and excercise. So you need a garden/decent park nearby. They are sight hounds so they may target other domestic pets, squirrels etc. Be ready for that. They are typically friendly dogs but nervous, so do need to be supervised with children up to 12. They are prone to dental issues and lacerations as they run a lot and bang into things and have thin skin. Warnings aside, they are good family dogs and there are many rescues so it's easy to find ones that need homes and whose temperament matches family and lifestyle. first dog? Then adoption is better because you can choose one more easily that has already had some training and is a good match. They tend to eat from kids and counter too as much as a Labrador! Better to choose a medium breed rather a larger lurcher if you have kids. So basically. Good choice, with a few caveats!! Hope that helps. 😀
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623ldn 
Barking mad...
Anonymous 
My sister is a veterinary nurse. She chose her dog very carefully based on breed personality etc. So not only is she a medical expert on animals, she's also an owner who's done her research. If you do decide to get a dog I could get some info on the best dog to chose to fit you and your family's needs. As you're 'giving up' I assume you're under pressure from your kids! 😁 Why do they want a dog and do they have a type of dog in mind?
Ben Tantrum 
Haha @623ldn that's too good!
Ben Tantrum 
We had a King Charles spaniel. Great family dog. Friendly, not too yappy and not too big that they need huge walks / huge garden.
Anonymous 
Oh yes. They want a Lurcher and promise they will look after it, of course.
Anonymous 
Feedback from my sister: Lurchers are cross breeds, so potentially healthier than the pure breeds they come from (whippet and greyhound for example). They need lots of space and excercise. So you need a garden/decent park nearby. They are sight hounds so they may target other domestic pets, squirrels etc. Be ready for that. They are typically friendly dogs but nervous, so do need to be supervised with children up to 12. They are prone to dental issues and lacerations as they run a lot and bang into things and have thin skin. Warnings aside, they are good family dogs and there are many rescues so it's easy to find ones that need homes and whose temperament matches family and lifestyle. first dog? Then adoption is better because you can choose one more easily that has already had some training and is a good match. They tend to eat from kids and counter too as much as a Labrador! Better to choose a medium breed rather a larger lurcher if you have kids. So basically. Good choice, with a few caveats!! Hope that helps. 😀
Guest1196 
Thank you! That's really helpful.
Guest1196 
The other one up for discussion is a miniature dachshund
Anonymous 
More sister feedback: Very different choice! Much smaller of course. Very lovable, curious, but stubborn lil things. Easier on lead and less exercise/space needed. However must think about stairs etc. And children handling/picking up. Can be snappy. Are also prone to spinal injury both accidental and hereditary. And eye problems. And obesity since they are often overfed by children in a kiddy household. Must choose the breeder very carefully. Prone to puppy farming sadly. Can be very barky and attention seeking but are playful and smart. As I say can be biters because of the attention seeking so not ideal with small kids. Older kids fine as long as they know how to properly handle the dog 🙂
Anonymous 
We have a dog! A whippet cross collie rescue from Hounds First. He's really good fun, but gentle. He's very good at sitting in the office as long as he gets long walks and a comfy chair. The only downside is he doesn't like to be on his own at all. Thank you for all the info!

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